WALKS

Unless I say otherwise my walks:

  • last about 90 minutes;
  • cost £12 per person (£9 for children); and
  • are conducted in English.

I try to give an idea of the terrain we cover for each one - generally speaking, we are walking on pavements so no need for hiking boots, but sensible shoes with a bit of shock-absorbtion will make the experience a happier one.


PLEASE NOTE: I run these tours in all weathers (unless advised otherwise by the Met Office, emergency services or one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse). If, for any reason, the tour is impossible to run then I will let you know as soon as possible and arrange a refund. I do not offer refunds under any other circumstances. Thank you for understanding.

CITY OF LONDON

Where it all began...

FLAMES, CONTAGION AND A FRAME-UP - PEPYS AND THE CITY

FLAMES, CONTAGION AND A FRAME-UP - PEPYS AND THE CITY

Samuel Pepys was born in the old City of London and was living there when it was all but destroyed by the Great Fire of 1666. He knew the Tower of London both as visitor (watching the Fire from its battlements) and a prisoner. He also saw the destruction of Old St Paul's and (most of) the construction of its magnificent replacement. We accompany him to view the Fire, staying through the Great Plague, having massive rows with his long-suffering wife - and we even accompany him to church, not a purely religious duty for him. Oh, and there's plenty of grisly detail about a 17th century surgical operation as well.

Tour starts from Blackfriars Station (front concourse) and end at Tower Hill.

PEPYS' LONDON - WESTMINSTER

PEPYS' LONDON - WESTMINSTER

Westminster Abbey remains, but the Whitehall of today is a pale reflection of the royal palace that stood there in Pepys' day.Here he bunked school to watch the execution of Charles I, and here he raced to bring Charles II news of the Great Fire.

Tour starts from Charing Cross Station (front concourse).

PEPYS' LONDON - THE CITY & WESTMINSTER

Please note, the two Pepys walks above can be run together into one, lasting approximately four hours (excluding breaks). There is a short distance between the two, for which you will need an Oyster card or taxi fare.

Tour starts at Tower Hill Tube Station.

CLERKENWELL AND ISLINGTON

My specialist area - Clerkenwell was the first suburb of London, home to monks, nuns and criminals evading the City's rules.  The village of Islington saw expansion with the canals and railways, ultimately enclosing the earlier settlement.  As always in London, clues to every stage of their history abound, if you only know where to look.

LEGGING IT UNDER ISLINGTON

LEGGING IT UNDER ISLINGTON

We join the Regent's Canal at Battle Bridge (that's Kings Cross for you post-1830 youngsters) and follow it twoards Islington, taking in some industrial architecture and redevelopment. As the Canal goes into a tunnel we leave it for a while as we walk through the specially created area of Pentonville (not including the prison!) and play some musical coffins before rejoining it at Angel Basin. We see canal engineering, narrowboats, Georgian domestic architecture and very modern developments.

Starts at Kings Cross (just outside Starbucks) and ends at the Angel, Islington. There will be some climbing, up steps and a hill.

RELIGION, REVOLUTION, RETRIBUTION

RELIGION, REVOLUTION, RETRIBUTION

Clerkenwell's history is full of contradictions. St John's Priory, British HQ for the Knights Hospitallers, was there for 400 years, as was the Nunnery of St Mary. A place for meditation and calm, you might think - but the area lay just north of the City of London and was a perfect hideaway for criminals escaping justice. Later, dirty and overcrowded, it was a centre of political agitation and dissent. The Victorians had a solution for the crime and rioting, and their brutal but effective legacy remains to this day.

Tour starts and finishes at Farringdon Tube Station.
No steps on this walk but a few slopes to go up and down. If in doubt please drop me a line.

ALL CHANGE FOR BATTLE BRIDGE!

ALL CHANGE FOR BATTLE BRIDGE!

The new railways allowed Victorians the chance to live away from their places of work, and new Utopias were built to accommodate this. Battle Bridge, a grotty little village by the 1840s, acquired a new statue and name (the statue was of George IV and the name was Kings Cross), and was transformed, if not necessarily improved, by the railway terminus. Other areas, originally delightful, were carved up and spoiled by this revolutionary change.

Goods and passengers rolled in from the north, workers moved here to be near the junctions that needed their care and markets moved from other parts of London to make use of the new transport miracle.

We'll be exploring all this (and more) as we follow the clues to discover the drastic changes made to this part of London.

Tour starts at Highbury & Islington Station and finishes at Kings Cross.

THE CHANGING FORTUNES OF CANONBURY

THE CHANGING FORTUNES OF CANONBURY

Taking its name from the landed clergy who owned it in medieval times,
Canonbury has been open fields, a Prior's country seat, a site of some of the earliest
speculative building, a run-down slum, home to George Orwell and Evelyn Waugh and a venue for some of the pioneers of punk rock. Now it is once again desirable and its elegant squares well-maintained.  Will this state of affairs endure?  There have been many battles for its land and soul and there may well be more. The walk takes in all of this, and a hugely impressive example of Jacobean public service too.

Tour starts and ends at Highbury & Islington Tube Station.

SPRINGS, SEWERS, RIVERS AND RAILWAYS

SPRINGS, SEWERS, RIVERS AND RAILWAYS

Just north of the City, Clerkenwell was the first suburb. Although precious little of the substance can be seen there nowadays, water defined the area for good and bad. Health-giving springs attracted the wealthy, polluted rivers attracted slums and prisons. Add to that the association of fresh water springs with religious sites in the early middle ages and typically exuberant Victorian engineers 600 years later and the history of this area is a mass of surprises.

Tour starts and finishes at Farringdon Station.
We are walking up and down the contours of a river bank, so a few gradients to climb and descend, but no stairs. If in doubt, please drop me a line.

ISLINGTON AND FINSBURY - A TALE OF TWO BOROUGHS

ISLINGTON AND FINSBURY - A TALE OF TWO BOROUGHS

Imagine a pub with 23 fireplaces, surrounded by other, smaller pubs, all around one road junction. This was the Angel, last stop for cattle dealers preparing to drive their herd down to Smithfield Market, and also for travellers arriving late in the day. The journey into town from Islington was dangerous after dark and a night in a nice warm pub would have been irresistible . Finsbury, the area south of Islington, remained poor and run-down, and the two areas were uncomfortable bedfellows right up to their amalgamation in the Sixties.

Tours begin and end at Angel, Islington.

FURTHER AFIELD

Greater London covers 606 square miles.  The West End and City combined make up 9,5 of those.

What about the rest?  let's get exploring.

WALTHAMSTOW VILLAGE BEFORE THE RAILWAY - GEORGE MONOUX & THE VICAR'S GLEBE

WALTHAMSTOW VILLAGE BEFORE THE RAILWAY - GEORGE MONOUX & THE VICAR'S GLEBE

Railways transformed British towns, and few were more drastically altered than Walthamstow, moving its entire town centre downhill in the 1870s. The old town, now known as the Village, dates from the 1100s and retains many features giving clues to what it was like and how it came into being.

Traces of old land divisions and speculative building estates are still there if you know where to look. Once it was little more than a church, open fields and a couple of tracks.  Pig Lane and Vinegar Alley were its roads.

They are still there and we can see them in the newly trendy Walthamstow Village.  The walk takes you back to the station but you can stay in the area and visit the local museum or any number of pubs and cafés.

Please note we do NOT visit the William Morris Museum on this walk.

WHATEVER YOU WANT

And last but far from least, if you have an area of interest, or want a more general stroll through the capital, I can customise a walk for you. As this will usually involve some time for me to research and plan it, I shall usually need two to three weeks' notice in order to prepare.

Please contact me with your requirements. Once you let me know what you have in mind, I get back to you within two days with a draft outline. If that's OK, we can go ahead.